Watch: This rare skunk does hand stands

The rare Kansas, Eastern spotted skunk, is known for doing hand stands. (Video by Saguaro National Park)
By
Up Next
The rare Kansas, Eastern spotted skunk, is known for doing hand stands. (Video by Saguaro National Park)
By

Outdoors

Have you seen this spotted skunk? The Kansas Department of Wildlife wants to know

By Kaitlyn Alanis

kalanis@wichitaeagle.com

December 07, 2017 12:15 PM

It is not at all uncommon to see a striped skunk with a black body, white stripe and a potential for a smelly, defensive odor as you travel throughout Kansas.

And while this striped skunk is common, the Eastern spotted skunk is not.

This spotted skunk is classified as threatened in Kansas and has previously been considered a “regulatory burden” by those who wished to build in an area where the skunks may live.

Kansas biologists want to know more about this rare skunk, but they could use your help.

Be the first to know.

No one covers what is happening in our community better than we do. And with a digital subscription, you'll never miss a local story.

Spotted skunks have a black body with multiple broken white lines across their body and a white triangle on their forehead, according to the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism. The squirrel-sized critters are smaller than striped skunks, but they can still release that musky scent as defense.

Oh, and just before a spotted skunk sprays its repugnant-smelling musk, you might see it perform a little hand stand, as seen in this video by BBC Wildlife.

Biologists with the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism who want to learn more about this rare and unique skunk are requesting your help in reporting spotted skunk sightings.

If you see an Eastern spotted skunk, the department requests you report the sighting, and sightings can include road kills, trail camera photos or spotted skunks who have been inadvertently trapped.

Mike Miller with Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism said Kansas biologists hope to learn more about the skunks’ range and location through these submitted reports.

Reports, preferably with photos, can be emailed to kdwpt.kdwptinfo@ks.gov.

Kaitlyn Alanis: 316-269-6708, @kaitlynalanis