Maize chief discusses false active shooter report

Maize Police chief Matt Jensby discussed the false active shooter report at Maize South High School.
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Maize Police chief Matt Jensby discussed the false active shooter report at Maize South High School.
By

Crime & Courts

Rumors, concerned parent led to false active-shooter call at Maize South, police say

By Nichole Manna And Kaitlyn Alanis

nmanna@wichitaeagle.com

kalanis@wichitaeagle.com

March 08, 2018 11:28 AM

Maize police investigators have determined what led up to a false call of an active shooter at Maize South High School on Thursday afternoon.

"Police response was initially prompted by a concerned parent who contacted 911 with information that they believed to be true," the department said on a Facebook post. "The information reported was coming from students at Maize South High School and was indicated a possible shooter with the school being placed on lockdown."

The information originated from rumors being circulated within the student body, the department said.

"This was in no way a hoax or swatting type incident," the post said.

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Maize Police Chief Matt Jensby said Thursday that when dispatch reported an active shooter to police and to the school, the School Resource Officer inside Maize South was surprised, because all was quiet.

"Our SRO that was stationed at the school didn't know of anything that was going on until he heard the dispatch call," the chief said. "He was on site, immediately took the necessary action to make sure everybody was safe in the school and almost immediately determined there was no active shooter in the school."

"Students were oblivious to what was even going on," Jensby said.

A father himself, Jensby said he responded to the call knowing one of his own children was inside the building.

"Of course any time there's an active shooter, all your past training goes through your head," he said. "What do I need to do when I get to the scene? Who is going to be there? There were multiple agencies who responded ... When everybody arrived, teams formed up. They got ready to go into the school. Of course we didn't need to do that."

Jensby called the response by all law enforcement officers and the school "textbook" and having an officer already inside the school was helpful.

"This is the way we'd want t to go if this were to happen," he said. "No law enforcement officer wants things like active shooters to happen at schools. Fear is the thing that runs through your body."

He said again on the Facebook post that the response was appropriate.



"In light of recent events, and heightened awareness of violence in schools, officers responded in an appropriate manner given the information that was reported to 911," the post said. "The Maize South SRO stationed within the school was able to quickly assess the situation and notify responding officers before they had to enter the school. In addition, school administrators followed proper protocol within the school for student and staff safety. No weapons were found on the Maize South Campus."